Lab class photo

College Catalog 2013-2014


Engineering Courses


ENGR 102 Engineering Design and Laboratory I
2-4-4
Engineering 102 provides for the development of analytical and communication skills by problem solving, teamwork and project presentation. The course gives instruction on how to use computers in engineering: how to utilize engineering software, problem solving, data acquisition and analysis. Included is how to use a computer algebra system to solve math and engineering problems. Students learn the elements of the engineering design process through execution of actual design projects. Other topics include an introduction to patents and patent law and the interaction between the engineer and physical environment. Offered only in the fall semester. Prerequisite: MATH 162 or a higher-level Mathematics course. Engineering Science majors only.
Additional course fee: $75.

ENGR 202 Engineering Design and Laboratory II
2-4-4
This course is a continuation of Engineering Design and Laboratory I. It provides for the development of analytical and communication skills by problem solving, teamwork and project presentation. The course gives instruction on how to use computers in engineering: how to utilize engineering software, problem solving, data acquisition and analysis. In addition, students learn technical sketching and computer-aided drafting techniques with industry-standard software. Students learn the elements of the engineering design process through execution of actual design projects. Offered only in the spring semester. Prerequisite: ENGR 102. Engineering Science majors only. Fulfills Writing Intensive requirement.
Additional course fee: $75.

ENGR 205 Materials Engineering
3-2-4
In this course, students will be taught to recognize and differentiate between the several types of engineering solids, understand solids at the atomic level in terms of bonding and energy, establish a quantitative picture of the structure of crystalline and non-crystalline solids, explain atomic movements in solids using the concept of diffusion, explain the electrical and magnetic properties of different kinds of materials, and understand the processes that give rise to degradation of materials. They will also learn to interpret the optical behavior of materials in terms of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the material and choose materials optimally for engineering design purposes. Offered only in the spring semester. Prerequisites: PHYS 241 and MATH 172. Engineering Science majors only.
Additional course fee: $75.

ENGR 210 Nanofabrication Manufacturing Technology Seminar
2-0-2
This course gives students an overview of typical nanofabrication applications, and provides an introduction to basic nanofabrication manufacturing technology fabrication process and related terminology, as well as an introduction to basic concepts of statistical process control. Prerequisite: MATH 118.

ENGR 211 Material, Safety & Equipment Overview for Nanofabrication
2-2-3
This course provides students with an overview of equipment and materials utilized in nanofabrication processes, as well as a review of safety factors related to both equipment and materials. The focus is on procedural, environmental, safety and health issues in equipment operation and material handling. Prerequisites: ENGR 210, ENGR 212 (which must be taken concurrently) and department head approval.
Additional course fee: $75.*

ENGR 212 Basic Nanofabrication Processes
2-2-3
This course provides students with an overview of the basic processing steps in nanofabrication and the equipment processes needed to fabricate devices and structures. Processing flow will be examined for structures such as microelectromechanical (MEM) devices, biomedical “lab-on-a-chip” structures, display devices and microelectronic devices, including diode, transistor and full CMOS structures. Prerequisites: ENGR 210, ENGR 211 (which must be taken concurrently) and department head approval.
Additional course fee: $75.*

ENGR 213 Thin Films in Nanofabrication
2-2-3
This course will cover thin film deposition and etching practices in nanofabrication. The deposition techniques covered will include atmospheric, low pressure and plasma- enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Materials to be considered will include dielectrics, polysilicon, metals, adhesion promoters and diffusion barriers. The second part of the course will focus on etching processes and will emphasize reactive ion etching, high-ion-density reactors, ion beam etching and wet chemical etching. Prerequisites: ENGR 210, ENGR 211, ENGR 212 (which may be taken concurrently), ENGR 214 (which must be taken concurrently) and department head approval.
Additional course fee: $75*.

ENGR 214 Lithography for Nanofabrication
2-2-3
This course will cover all aspects of lithography from design and mask fabrication to pattern transfer and inspection. Topics covered will include substrate preparation, the nature and behavior of photoresist materials, exposure, optical masks, aligners, steppers, scanners, control of critical dimensions and profiles, and advanced optical lithography techniques. Prerequisites: ENGR 210, ENGR 211, ENGR 212 (which may be taken concurrently), ENGR 213 (which must be taken concurrently) and department head approval.
Additional course fee: $75.*

ENGR 215 Materials Modification in Nanofabrication
2-2-3
This course will explore in detail the process steps used in modifying material properties in nanofabrication. Included will be growth and annealing processes utilizing horizontal and vertical furnaces as well as rapid thermal annealing. The impact of thermal processing on defects, impurities and overall electrical, mechanical, optical and chemical properties will be studied. The student will grow and measure gate and field oxides, implant and activate source and drain regions, and evaluate thermal budget requirements, using state-of-the-art tools. Ion implantation, diffusion and surface preparation and treatment will also be covered. Prerequisites: ENGR 210, ENGR 211, ENGR 212, ENGR 213, ENGR 214 (which may be taken concurrently), ENGR 216 (which must be taken concurrently) and department head approval.
Additional course fee: $75.*

ENGR 216 Characterization, Packaging and Testing of Nanofabrication Structures
2-2-3
This course will examine a variety of techniques and measurements essential for controlling device fabrication and final packaging. Monitoring and characterization techniques will be discussed. Basic electrical measurements on device structures for yield analysis and process control will also be stressed. In addition, the course will examine mechanical and electrical characteristics of simple MEMS devices, and chemical and biological responses of nanofabricated biomedical structures. Students will also learn about the manufacturing issues involved in topics such as interconnects, isolation and final device assembly. Prerequisites: ENGR 210, ENGR 211, ENGR 212, ENGR 213, ENGR 214 (which may be taken concurrently), ENGR 215 (which must be taken concurrently) and department head approval.
Additional course fee: $75.*

ENGR 221 Vector Mechanics I (Statics)
3-0-3
Students will learn how to use analytic geometry, differential and integral calculus and vector algebra in solving engineering problems. They will also learn about the concept of the free-body diagram and its use in conjunction with static equilibrium of forces. The course will focus upon using the deductive process to solve a great variety of problems involving particles and rigid bodies in a state of static equilibrium. Engineering Science majors only. Prerequisites: PHYS 140 and MATH 172.

ENGR 222 Vector Mechanics II (Dynamics)
3-0-3
Students will learn how to use calculus-based mathematics in solving engineering problems in dynamics, including problems related to rectilinear and curvilinear motion of rigid bodies and concept of impact, rotation and acceleration of the system of rigid bodies in a plane motion. Offered only in the Spring semester Prerequisites: ENGR 221 and MATH 271.

Unless otherwise noted, all college level courses require English 101 placement.

*Effective Fall 2011.